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Center for Fundamental Theory Center for Theoretical and Observational Cosmology Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics

The Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos is a multidisciplinary institute of Penn State researchers dedicated to the study of the most fundamental structure and constituents of the Universe.

News and Events

  • IGC is co-sponsoring this year's Frontiers of Science Lecture Series entitled "100 Years after Einstein's Greatest Discovery: New Science from General Relativity." The series will consist of 6 public lectures, held on consecutive Saturdays in 100 Thomas Building at the University Park Campus.

    January 24: "Understanding Einstein's Greatest Discovery," John Norton (Director, Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh)

    January 31: "Sculpting the Universe," David Weinberg (The Henry L. Cox Professor and Distinguished Professor of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Ohio State)

    February 7: "The Warped Side of the Universe," Nergis Mavalvala (The Curtis and Kathleen Marble Professor of Astrophysics, MIT)

    February 14: "Capturing the Birth Cries of Black Holes," John Nousek (Director of Mission Operations at NASA's SWIFT Satellite)

    February 21: "Discovering Planets," Jason Wright (Astronomy and Astrophysics, Penn State)

    February 28: "Pushing Science Beyond Einstein," Eugenio Bianchi (Physics, Penn State)
  • Main results of a recent paper by Abhay Ashtekar, Beatrice Bonga and Aruna Kesavan (Class. Quantum Grav. 32, 025004) were highlighted by the British IOP on their website CQGplus PDF
  • Lucas Hackl has been selected to serve as the APS student representative on the Science and Human Rights Coalition of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The coalition seeks to encourage the "science, engineering and health communities" to "embrace human rights as an area suitable for and deserving of robust inquiry, and become an influential voice in the defense of human rights."
  • The IceCube 2014 discovery of a 2 PeV cosmic neutrino event ("Big Bird") has been featured by APS as one of the Top 10 Physics News Stories in 2014.

World's Most Extreme Scientific Construction Project


IceCube, the world's largest observatory ever built to detect the elusive sub-atomic particles called neutrinos, has just been completed in the crystal clear ice at the South Pole. Trillions of neutrinos stream through the human body at any given moment, but they rarely interact with regular matter, and researchers want to know more about them. The observatory provides an innovative means to investigate the sources and properties of neutrinos, which originate in some of the most spectacular phenomena in the universe.

Over a multi-year construction period, Penn State scientists, Doug Cowen and Tyce DeYoung have worked with the IceCube Project to melt 86 holes - each 1.5 miles deep - in the polar ice cap and inserted strings of light sensors into each hole. More....

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